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I think I cooked my computer
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Marie Lawson Offline
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Post: #1
I think I cooked my computer
Hey all,

So... I was in the middle of playing The Division when my computer turned off...

the LED indicating the PC was on was solid blue and everything else was off...

I turned off the power and then attempted to start it. there was a brief second that the fans turned on then everything just went back off.

Have I broken my computer? I think it overheated as the CPU (FX-4130) had a ton of heat coming off of it :/

Help me, please?

Mohawk College Alumni - Business Fundamentals Certificate, Radio Broadcasting Diploma
Mohawk College Employee - Hospitality, Purchasing & Ancillary Services
04-02-2017 01:02 AM
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Tyrann Offline
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RE: I think I cooked my computer
(04-02-2017 01:02 AM)Marie Lawson Wrote:  Hey all,

So... I was in the middle of playing The Division when my computer turned off...

the LED indicating the PC was on was solid blue and everything else was off...

I turned off the power and then attempted to start it. there was a brief second that the fans turned on then everything just went back off.

Have I broken my computer? I think it overheated as the CPU (FX-4130) had a ton of heat coming off of it :/

Help me, please?

CPUs give off a decent amount of heat normally. If it was the CPU there would be BIOS beeps normally. Based on what you said, my guess would be either the power supply or possibly the motherboard itself.

Are you able to bring the PC in for diagnostics?


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04-02-2017 01:04 PM
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Norman Walsh Offline
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Reply to Marie Lawson
Hi Marie, when your computer gets to a certain temperature it automatically shuts down built in safe guard, check fans making sure you have good air flow first and remove dust build up. Second thing does your computer post if not it could be mother board, if it has a funny spell its the power supply. Third thing usually related is memory / ram if not booting. Hope this info helps have a good weekend. Wink
(This post was last modified: 04-08-2017 03:25 PM by Norman Walsh.)
04-08-2017 03:18 PM
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Marie Lawson Offline
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Post: #4
RE: I think I cooked my computer
Hey,

So, I ended up doing a paperclip test on the PSU and it failed miserably! I ended up going into CC and buying a brand new Corsair CX600 to replace the one that ended up failing and the computer is back up and running!

I was pretty sure I pooched the MB/CPU which would have been really expensive to replace!

This issue has been solved, thanks for the assistance in diagnosing the problem

Mohawk College Alumni - Business Fundamentals Certificate, Radio Broadcasting Diploma
Mohawk College Employee - Hospitality, Purchasing & Ancillary Services
(This post was last modified: 04-09-2017 05:52 PM by Marie Lawson.)
04-09-2017 05:50 PM
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Pontiac Offline
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RE: Reply to Marie Lawson
(04-08-2017 03:18 PM)Norman Walsh Wrote:  Hi Marie, when your computer gets to a certain temperature it automatically shuts down built in safe guard, check fans making sure you have good air flow first and remove dust build up. Second thing does your computer post if not it could be mother board, if it has a funny spell its the power supply. Third thing usually related is memory / ram if not booting. Hope this info helps have a good weekend. Wink

That first part isn't always true. I've SEEN CPUs not throttle themselves and just go until they bake themselves to a crisp. AFAIK, and I may be mistaken, but Intel does do thermal throttling across all their CPUs. Back in the day, AMD would just chug until it wouldn't chug anymore due to melting metals. I do not know what AMD does with Ryzen for overheating situations. This may have all changed since I was working in the computer shop more than a decade ago, but still.

Note, if overclocking, the closer to the edge you are with concerns to stability, a bad PSU and bad power flow could cause the CPU to turn itself into a paperweight.

@OP Marie;

If your PSU was baked, look at the capacitors on the motherboard to see if any of them are starting to bulge. Without cracking open the PSU to look at its state (Which is now probably in the garbage/recycling facility, I know) and why it failed, bad power flow may have been pushed to your mobo which would cause other things to potentially fail. The first and visually obvious thing to go usually are the capacitors, which can cause serious instability in your system, especially at load. There are times I've heard capacitors whine because of their being faulty. (Or maybe it was components the caps were connected to, not sure exactly)

Actually, even decent power supplies won't prevent damage. There was a period where capacitors were just bad right off the line and would fail after a period of time. I've seen mobos come in months later after I built them with caps bleeding all over the place. I saw one motherboard with a popped cap. Customer heard a boom inside the case, bad smell, then brought it in. VERY not typical.

If the caps are starting to show bulging, or, are leaking, there are a couple of options to correct.

Replace the board completely, but that might mean new CPU and memory, depending on the age and manufacturer. Expensive route.

The other option is to have the capacitors replaced. I've done this to several boards, and different components with great success (I failed on one monitor, but, it was fizzing to begin with). Who you'd go to for that, I'm not sure around here, but paying someone $70+parts (Or buying the equipment to do it yourself) for a few minutes worth of work is much more cheaper than the new parts to get a working machine again.

I guess a third option is to just deal with it until it does finally completely die out, meanwhile saving for a new machine
05-03-2017 04:29 PM
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